Thursday, December 22, 2011

FTM2012 - AMT - Clean Up from AMT Updates

Continuing working with FTM2012, an Ancestry Member Tree (AMT) and the TreeSync™ feature, I wanted to post what might be consider doing when the AMT has been updated. Specifically in the area of Census Records.

When a Census Record is added to a person, in the AMT, only that person's record will include the Citation for the facts that were found. This also applies to early Census Records when using the Web Search, Web Merge feature. Here is an example of an 1850 census record that was done in the AMT.














I noted that the URL in the lower right, and that was the reminder that this Citation was created online in the AMT linked to this FTM2012 file.

Note that there are only three (3) Facts linked to that Citation. However, if I look at that Census Record (printer friendly form), we see that there are 5 people that were on that record.













These other four people do not have the 1850 Census Record linked to them.

In addition, the Source Citation and Source Information is note complete in the Citation Details nor Citation Text.





I copied the Source Citation text from the printer friendly form and pasted that into the Citation Details field. The complete Roll, Page, and Image are important for me in the Citation Details. (this is not unique to the update in the AMT, but is part of my clean up following a web merge as well)

The clean up that is done from here, is to view that print out, and add the Citation to each Fact that is gathered from that Census Record.

Each Census Year will provide different pieces of information. For the 1850 Census, I try to gather:
  • No Relationships
  • Names
  • Ages
  • Abt year of birth
  • State where born
  • Occupation if listed
I try to do that for every one listed.

Since there are no relationships listed, I use the Name Fact, Notes field to record the House Hold and ages of those in the household. It helps later on when relationships do start to appear in the 1880 Census.

Here is an example:






or:

1850 Census links David Auble (32) to Sarah Auble (30), William Auble (5); Francis Auble (3); Charles Auble (1)

I have blogged about this before. This same data in pasted on each persons Name Fact Notes.

After going through everyone listed, adding new facts, or citing existing fact, the Citation usage now looks like this.














Bottom line, I went for 3 facts using this Citation to 18 facts for these 5 people.

Why do all of this: I can quickly see what Census Records I might have overlooked for that person. As I use the Residence Fact for recording where someone lived at the time the Census was taken, I can see pretty quickly what census years I need to go after.

The Name Fact Notes help me develop the relationships over time. Looking at the 1860 census record and recording it in the Name Fact Notes, I see:

  • 1850 Census links David Auble (32) to Sarah Auble (30), William Auble (5); Francis Auble (3); Charles Auble (1)
  • 1860 Census links David Auble to Sarah Auble (59); Wm A Auble (15); Mary F Auble (13); Chas Auble (11); Kate Auble (8); Anna Auble (1); Mary Caughlin (26) - Servant from Ireland
In the 1860 Census, Mary F appears as being 13, so where was she in the 1850 Census? Frances is gone, but she was 13. I wonder if Francis in 1850 is not Mary F in 1860. Haven't found what the F is for Mary. Wonder if it's Francis.

Kate, Anna, are new, and were born after the 1850 Census. I also include here, the Servant. I don't, at this point, have any need to be in my database, but she, Mary, was a member of the household.

Sounds like extra work, right? BUT, look at the 1870 Census Record

  • 1870 Census links Daniel Auble (53) to Sarah Auble (50); Mary F Auble (23); Charles Auble (21); Rate Auble (17); Anna Auble (10); Cora A Auble (8)
David is not Daniel, and Kate is now Rate. The census image confirms what is here, do I noted that it may have been a census recording issue.

William is gone, Francis is gone or is that Mary F. Cora is new, but only 8.

Looking at the Image itself, it's noted that David was a Boot and Shoemaker, so that was entered at his occupation in 1850. That may be useful in the future.

Lesson Learned: Review the data that was added from the TreeSync.

I have found, over time, that these few extra steps help put the family picture together.





Copyright © 2011 by H R Worthington

Print Friendly